FAQ

Physical Therapists (PTs) are health care professionals who evaluate and treat individuals of all ages who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their ability to function optimally. They utilize treatment techniques to promote movement, reduce pain, restore function and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

 

A Functional Manual Therapist, FMT, is a physical therapist who has taken post-graduate coursework with an emphasis on restoration of an individual’s optimal function. An FMT addresses the body as a whole and identifies the source of an individual’s loss of function and utilizes manual, hands-on, techniques to improve strength, endurance and neuromuscular control with the ultimate goal of achieving optimal human movement.

In the state of Illinois, physical therapists no longer are required to have a physician’s referral/prescription to begin physical therapy. This means you have direct access to seek immediate treatment from your highly skilled and educated physical therapist.

Your physical therapist (PT) will perform a comprehensive examination via taking a subjective interview and medical history followed by diagnostic tests and measurements related to your existing condition. Your PT will determine the possible source of your symptoms after synthesizing the gathered information and formulate a patient-centered plan of care. At the completion of the examination, your PT will discuss which interventions as well as what time frame and frequency would be ideal to achieve your desired goals and outcomes.

Most major insurance plans and federal programs do have benefits available for physical therapy. Please contact our billing office for a complimentary quote of benefits via email at billing@exemplarphysicaltherapychicago.com or via phone at 773-516-4146. It is very important to us that you understand your coverage so that we can tailor a plan that fits your budget.

A deductible is an amount of money set by your insurance policy that needs to be paid out-of-pocket annually before your insurance company will start to pay out benefits for service. Once you meet this deductible amount, you still may owe for co-insurance or co-pay amounts.

Co-insurance is a percentage of the total payable amount that you will owe for a specific date of service. These are usually presented as 80%/20%. The first percentage indicates the portion of the payable amount your insurance company will cover, while the second percentage indicates the portion of the payable amount for which you may be responsible. For instance, if you were billed for services $100, $80 would be paid by the insurance company and you would be responsible for $20. If you have not met your deductible you will pay the full allowed amount, $100.

A co-pay is a fixed out-of-pocket amount paid by an insured for covered services. It is a standard part of many health insurance plans. Insurance providers often charge co-pays for healthcare services.

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